Quotations

Click HERE to download 90 pages of quotations.

Below are the quotations on the walls of the Clayton Jackson McGhie Memorial in Duluth, Minnesota.

James Baldwin (1924–1987)
 We are responsible for the world in which we find ourselves, if only because we are the only sentient force that can change it.

Gautama Buddha (566–480BCE) 
Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one getting burned.

Edmund Burke (1729–1797) 
An event has happened, upon which it is difficult to speak and impossible to remain silent.

Marian Wright Edelman (1939–  ) If you as parents cut corners, your children will too. If you lie, they will too. . . . If parents snicker at racial and gender jokes, another generation will pass on the poison adults still have not had the courage to snuff out.

Albert Einstein (1879–1955) 
The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.

Euripides (484–406BCE) 
Love is all we have, the only way that each can help the other.

Thich Nhat Hanh (1926–  ) 
Hatred can never answer hatred; all violence is injustice.

Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929–1968) 
He who is devoid of the power to forgive is devoid of the power to love.

Anne Lamott (1954–  ) 
Forgiveness is giving up all hope of having had a better past.

A Native American elder once described his own inner struggles in this manner:
“Inside of me there are two dogs. One of the dogs is mean and evil, the other dog is good. The mean dog fights the good dog all the time.”
 When asked which dog wins, he reflected for a moment and replied,
 “The one I feed the most.”

Bertrand Russell (1872–1970) 
The reformative effect of punishment is a belief that dies hard, chiefly, I think, because it is so satisfying to our sadistic impulses.

Elie Wiesel (1928–  ) 
There may be times when we are powerless to prevent injustice, but there must never be a time when we fail to protest.

Oscar Wilde (1854–1900) 
The truth is rarely pure, and never simple.

In the concrete walkway are three words—Compassion, Respect, and Atonement.