Youth

Umar Farouk Abdul Mutallab apparently tried to blow up an airplane he was on as it landed at Detroit. All he managed to do was burn his legs, and then the passengers jumped him, and now he’s in prison forever. At least that’s my prediction. No matter what comes out eventually about Umar Farouk Abdul Mutallab’s motives and beliefs, because he wasn’t the goon of an acceptable corporation—sovereign or otherwise—I’m guessing he’s behind bars for good. If he had tried doing something equally heinous for the feds, Hillary Clinton would be trying to arrange for his release. He’d be a hero, having bravely risked his life for his government.

Every time our courageous defenders of freedom shoot and miss, they do what Umar Farouk Abdul Mutallab did—try to kill somebody and fail.

Umar Farouk Abdul Mutallab spent some time in London, so I suppose the U.S. will bomb London now. These colors still don’t run. I’m guessing that’s what’ll happen, except to Yemen.

Writing for the Huffington Post, Jon Gambrell says, “Devoutly religious, he was nicknamed “The Pope” because of his saintly aura and gave few clues in his youth that he would turn radical, friends and family said.” A saintly aura is radical.

An old story—“A man bumped into another on the street and both fell, belongings scattered about. The man berated the other man’s clumsiness until he realized that it was an elderly blind man, who was apparently injured. The man’s heart went out to the blind man and he begged his forgiveness and cared for him.” The only thing that changed was the man’s perception, the ideas in his own personal head.

I’d like to see Umar Farouk Abdul Mutallab get a break. I was clueless at 23. Totally. So were you. I hadn’t been married even the first time, but at least I was getting laid. Poor Umar Farouk Abdul Mutallab sounds too pious and repressed for that. No wonder he went off. At a certain time of in the life of a heterosexual man, masturbation or marriage is necessary for mental health.

Umar Farouk Abdul Mutallab is a somewhat sheltered and very young man, nervous, fearful, depressed, and conflicted—he put it off as long as he could; the plane was landing, for Pete’s sake. Now he’s in jail and his legs hurt. He’s learned his lesson. Suppose that after hours of screwing up his courage to face his own death, when he finally made his move, he was sobbing. Suppose he were your child.

Posted Thursday, January 7th, 2010 under compassion, forgiveness, kindness, terrorism, Uncategorized.

3 comments

  1. Richard P. Mazzucchi says:

    I wish to express my outrage regarding Anthony Porter’s characterization of Umar Farouk Abdul Mutallab as a misguided youth, and the comparison of his attempted premeditated murder of hundreds of innocent people to soldiers that may misdirect armaments intended for enemy combatants. Far from a conservative hawk, I am a progressive conscientious objector and pacifist, but even I cannot rationalize Umar’s egregious behavior considering he is neither impoverished nor uneducated and has no moral justification for his actions. Being 23 years old and possibly sexually frustrated and impressionable certainly does not give one license to attempt such a blatant assault upon humanity. Should we fail as a nation to demonstrate our universal disgust for such activity we abet similar terrorist activity, regardless of intention. While I admire Mr. Porter’s willingness to voice unpopular perspectives, it is clear to most that we must send a clear message by taking away this young man’s freedom rather than somehow excuse his misdeed as the natural consequence of a sheltered upbringing or and youthful folly. I used to joke “I am sure glad the shoe bomber wasn’t an underwear bomber,” given the need to remove shoes when entering aircraft concourses, sadly this is no longer humorous but a real dilemma all of us must now contend with.

    Rick

  2. David Cummings says:

    Whether it is Mr. Mutallab or some other young man or woman who is coerced into acts of violence it is a tragedy. And it usually is the young and impressionable among us who are sent to do the dirty work of those who they look up to for guidance. While I don’t think this young man should be able to walk away from this without having to face up to the responsibility of what he attempted to do, I really hope he is not given a lengthy prison term. I believe if you want to add another terrorist to the list who may now have the resolve to actually hurt someone then send this kid to jail. Maybe it’s not too late for him.

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